Plenary Speakers



Plenary Speaker

Prof. Donald A. Tomalia

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Dr. Tomalia received his B.A. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and while at The Dow Chemical Company completed his Ph.D. in physical-organic chemistry from Michigan State University under the mentorship of Professor Harold Hart. His discovery of the cationic polymerization of 2-oxazolines led to two international industrial research awards (R&D-100) for creative research in 1978 and 1986. His discovery of dendrimers (dendritic polymer architecture) in 1979 led to a third R&D-100 Award in 1991 and the Leonardo da Vinci Award (Paris, France) in 1996. He received the Society of Polymer Science Japan (SPSJ) Award for Outstanding Achievement in Polymer Science (2003) for discovery of the fourth major macromolecular architectural class, dendritic polymers.

In 1990, he joined the Michigan Molecular Institute (MMI) as Professor and Director of Nanoscale Chemistry & Architecture (1990-99). Dendritech, Inc., the first commercial producer of dendrimers, was co-founded by Dr. Tomalia in 1992 after which he was named founding President and Chief Scientist (1992-2000). He became V.P. of Technology for MMI (1998-2000) while simultaneously serving as Scientific Director for the Biologic Nanotechnology Center, University Michigan Medical School (1998-2000). Dr. Tomalia founded Dendritic Nanotechnologies, Inc. (DNT), Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, in a joint venture with Starpharma Pooled Development (Melbourne, Australia) (2002) and served as President/Chief Scientific Officer and Company Director (2002-2007).

Currently, he is the CEO/Founder of NanoSynthons. Dr. Tomalia currently serves as Associate Editor, Nanomedicine (Elsevier); Associate Editor, Journal of Nanoparticle Research; Editorial Advisory Board, Bioconjugate Chemistry; Faculty Member, Faculty 1000 Biology; Director of The National Dendrimer & Nanotechnology Center; Distinguished Visiting Professor (Columbia University, Chemistry); Adjunct Professor (University of Pennsylvania, Chemistry) and Affiliate Professor (Virginia Commonwealth University, Physics). He is the inventor of over 128 U.S. patents and author of >240 peer reviewed publications. In 2011, Tomalia was inducted into the Thomas Reuters Hall of Citation Laureates in Chemistry (i.e., 40 most highly cited scientists in the field of chemistry). His research interests have been focused on a new nano-periodic concept for unifying nanoscience and predicting nano-building block property patterns.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Krzysztof (Kris) Matyjaszewski, Ph.D., professor in the department of chemistry at the Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University, is an internationally recognized polymer chemist who is highly regarded for his vision, his leadership in education and his many collaborative research efforts that have yielded significant innovations in polymer chemistry. He is perhaps best known for the discovery of atom radical transfer polymerization (ATRP), a novel method of polymer synthesis that has revolutionized the way macromolecules are made.

Matyjaszewski has received numerous awards for his work, including the 2014 National Institute of Materials Science (Japan) Award, the Inaugural AkzoNobel North American Science Award (ACS) 2013, the 2012 Société Chimique de France Prize, 2012 Dannie-Heineman Prize from the Goettingen Academy of Sciences 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry, 2011 Japanese Society for Polymer Science Award and 2009 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award. He has been honored by the American Chemical Society with their inaugural 2013 AkzoNobel North America Science Award, 2011 Herman F. Mark Award, 2011 Applied Polymer Science Award, 2007 Herman F. Mark Senior Scholar Award, 2004 Cooperative Research Award in Polymer Science & Engineering, 2002 Polymer Chemistry Award, and the 1995 Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award. He also received the 2005 UK Macro Medal for outstanding achievements in polymer science, 1995 Humboldt Award for Senior U.S. Scientists and a 1989 Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. In 2010, he was elected as Fellow of the American Chemical Society, in 2006, he was elected a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and in 2014 he was elected a Fellow of National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He is also a member of Russian Academy of Sciences and honorary member of Chinese Chemical Society and Israel Chemical Society.

Matyjaszewski’s work has been well recognized in his native country of Poland. In 2012 He received Marie Sklodowska-Curie Medal from Polish Chemical Society and in 2004, the Annual Prize of the Foundation of Polish Science, referred to as the Polish Nobel Prize. In 2005 he became a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Science, and in 2007, he received an honorary degree from Lodz Polytechnic in Poland. He has also received honorary degrees from the University of Ghent, Belgium, Russian Academy of Sciences, University of Athens, Greece, Polytechnic Institute in Toulouse, France, Pusan National University, South Korea, Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France: Universite P. & M. Curie, Sorbonne, France.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Cornelia Bohne

University of Victoria, Canada

Cornelia Bohne did her undergraduate and doctoral degrees at the University of São Paulo in Brazil before moving to a Canadian post-doctoral position at the Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences in 1987. In early 1992 she joined the University of Victoria.

Cornelia is internationally recognized for her pioneering work in the area of supramolecular dynamics in both organic model systems and in biological molecules. Her physical organic studies of the photochemistry of host-guest complexes, and of photochromism and photoisomerism combine photochemical and photophysical techniques to develop mechanistic insights into highly complex systems. She has applied similar combinations of techniques to problems ranging from protein-ligand binding, to supramolecular gels, to asphaltene aggregation and paper yellowing.

The impact of Cornelia’s work has been widely recognized by the CSC (Clara Benson award 2008; FCIC 2011), and most recently by the Inter-American Photochemical Society Award (2015). She has been invited to speak throughout the Americas, Japan, and Europe. She has served the Canadian science community extensively through NSERC (Chemistry GSC 1999-2002, Chair 2001-2002; AGENO 2003-04) and the CRC program (Interdisciplinary Adjudication committee 2010-, Chair 2013-2014). She served on the editorial advisory board and as associate editors of several journals and has been recently appointed co-editor of ACS Omega – the new ACS open-access journal.

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Keynote Speakers



Plenary Speaker

Prof. Marco-Aurelio De Paoli



Prof. Marco-Aurelio De Paoli got his BSc in Chemistry from Universidade de Brasília (Brazil, 1970), and his PhD from University of Sao Paulo (Brazil, 1974). He did postdoctoral research at Max Planck Institut fuer Strahlenchemie (MPIS, Germany, 1975), at Frankfurt University (Germany, 1976), at IBM Research Center at Almaden (IBMRCA, USA, 1983), at Hahn-Meitner Institut (HMI, Germany, 1996).

Prof. Marco-Aurelio De Paoli is a Member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences. He has been a Professor at Chemistry Institute of Unicamp, Campinas, Brazil since 1977. Has large experience in Polymer Chemistry, focusing on the following subjects: polymer stabilization and degradation, polymeric composites and polymer formulation in general.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Eva Harth



Eva was born in Cologne, Germany and studied chemistry at the University of Bonn and the University of Zurich, Switzerland. She obtained her PhD in 1998 for work in the area of fullerene adducts and polymers from the MPI for Polymer Research in Mainz. A postdoctoral fellowship with CPIMA (NSF-Center for Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies) brought her to the IBM Almaden Research Center, California USA, focusing on the development of new living free polymerization techniques and approaches to nanoscopic materials. In 2001, she joined XenoPort, Inc. as a Staff Scientist and started at Vanderbilt University as Assistant Professor with a primary appointment in the Department of Chemistry in 2004 and was promoted to Associate Professor of Chemistry in 2011. In 2007, she was awarded with the NSF CAREER Award. In the spring semester 2014 she was a visiting professor at the Université Paris-Sud (UFR Pharmacie), France, and the Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

She is an Associate Editor of Polymer Chemistry (RSC) and the Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Material Science (IGPMS)

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Osvaldo Oliveira



Osvaldo N. Oliveira Jr. is a physicist, with BSc and MSc from the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, and PhD from University of Wales, Bangor (1990). Prof. Oliveira has led research into the fabrication of novel materials in the form of ultrathin films obtained with the Langmuir-Blodgett and self-assembly techniques. Most of this work has been associated with fundamental properties of ultrathin films with molecular control, but technological aspects have also been addressed in specific projects. This is the case of an electronic tongue, whose response to a number of tastants is considerably more sensitive than the human gustatory system. Prof. Oliveira has helped establish the Núcleo Interinstitucional de Linguística Computacional (NILC), which is a leading institute for natural language processing of Portuguese. Research and development activities at NILC include the development of a grammar checker for Brazilian Portuguese, now available worldwide through Microsoft Word, and participation in the Universal Networking Language (UNL) Project, sponsored by the United Nations University. He published two books on outreach activities and edited a book on scientific writing. In recent years, Prof. Oliveira has pioneered the combined use of methods from distinct fields of science, with the merge of methods of statistical physics and computer science to process text, and use of information visualization to enhance the performance of sensing and biosensing. He is a member of the board of scientific journals, and is currently associate editor for the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and for Display and Imaging. In 2006 he was awarded the Scopus Prize, given to 16 Brazilian researchers considered the most productive in terms of papers published and citations.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. John Dutcher



Prof. John Dutcher is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Soft Matter Physics in the Department of Physics at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. He is the Director of the Nanoscience program at the University of Guelph, and Director of the Centre for Food and Soft Materials Science at the University of Guelph, and as Theme Leader for the Advanced Foods and Materials Network. He is the Founder and Chairman of Mirexus Inc.

He serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Polymer Science: Polymer Physics, and on the Editorial Board of Soft Matterl. Dr. Dutcher is the recipient of an Ontario Premier's Research Excellence Award, and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. For his research accomplishments, he received the Premier’s Research Excellence Award in 2000, and was elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2007.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Luiz Henrique Catalani



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Marisa Masumi Beppu



Prof. Marisa Beppu Graduated as Chemical Engineer from Universidade Estadual de Campinas (1993), Master's in Chemical Engineering from Universidade Estadual de Campinas (1996) and PhD in Chemical Engineering from Universidade Estadual de Campinas (1999). Currently she is the director of the School of Chemical Engineering (Unicamp), and she is a CNPq productivity fellow. Her research group focus in Chemical Engineering, acting on the following subjects: natural polymers, process engineering, adsorption, biomaterials, calcification and phosphates.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Brent S. Sumerlin



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Plenary Speaker

Dr. Christopher L. Soles



In 1993, Christopher L. Soles received Bachelors of Science degrees from the University of Michigan in Mechanical Engineering as well as Materials Science and Engineering. In 1998 he completed is Doctorate in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan under the guidance of Professor Albert Yee. In 1999 he received a NIST-NRC Postdoctoral Fellowship to work with Dr. Wen-li Wu of the NIST Polymers Division and in 2002 made the transition to a permanent research staff scientist. His research interests include thin films and polymers under confinement, polymer dynamics, lithographic pattering, porous materials, organic semiconducting materials, and ion containing polymers for energy storage and delivery. He has published over 130 peer-reviewed publications and received several notable awards. Christopher L. Soles currently leads the Functional Polymers Group, part of the Materials Measurement Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Valtencir Zucolotto



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Frank N. Crespilho



Prof. Dr. Frank N. Crespilho received his BS in 2002 and MS in Chemistry in 2004 from the São Paulo University (Brazil). He received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the same institution in 2007 with Prof. Dr. Francisco C. Nart and Prof. O.N. Oliveira Jr. (co-supervisor), with one-year stay as Visiting Researcher (2005-2006) in the lab of Prof. Dr. C.M.A. Brett at University of Coimbra (Portugal). He was Post-Doctoral Researcher (2008) in the lab of Prof. Dr. V. Zucolotto (USP, Brazil) and Associate Professor of Chemistry at Federal University (UFABC), Brazil (2009-2012). He was Visiting Associate in Chemistry at California Institute of Technology, Caltech (EUA), in the Prof. Dr. J.K. Barton’s Group (2014-2015), and Visiting Professor at Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart, Germany (2016), working at Prof. Dr. Klaus Kern Group with Dr. Kannan Balasubramanian (Senior Scientist). Since 2012, Dr. Crespilho is Professor of Physical-Chemistry at Chemistry Institute of São Carlos, São Paulo University (Brazil). Research interests of Professor Crespilho include Bioelectrochemical Devices; Nanoelectrodes; Biomolecule-Electrode Redox Reactions; Fundamental and Applied Bioelectrochemistry.

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Invited Speakers



Plenary Speaker

Prof. Matthew L. Becker



Matthew Becker is the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering at The University of Akron. Professor Becker joined UA in 2009 where he is a Professor of Polymer Science and Biomedical Engineering. To date, his group has published more than 100 papers and has 20 patents pending. He is the founder of two start-up companies, 3D Bioresins & 3D Bioactives. In 2015, Professor Becker was one of two scientists worldwide under 40 named Macromolecules-Biomacromolecules Young Investigators.

Professor Becker completed his PhD in organic chemistry in 2003 at Washington University in St. Louis under the direction of Professor Karen L Wooley as an NIH Chemistry-Biology Interface Training Fellow. In 2003, Dr Becker moved to the Polymers Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology for a NRC Postdoctoral Fellowship in biophysics. He joined the permanent staff in 2005 and led projects in bioimaging and combinatorial methods for tissue engineering working with the NIH, Industry and FDA to advance measurement methods for combination products. He received his BS in chemistry in 1998 from Northwest Missouri State University.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Daniel A. Savin



Professor Daniel Savin received a BS in chemistry (1995) from Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, CA. While there he worked for Prof. Kerry Karukstis in the area of biophysical chemistry. He went to graduate school at Carnegie Mellon University where he received an MS in polymer science (1997) and a PhD in chemistry (2002) working for Prof. Gary Patterson. After a postdoctoral position with Prof. Timothy Lodge at the University of Minnesota, he began his independent research career in 2003 at the University of Vermont (UVM) in the Department of Chemistry. He moved to the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials at the University of Southern Mississippi in 2008, and joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Florida in 2015.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Sarah Perry



Sarah L. Perry received BS degrees in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry from the University of Arizona, as well as a MS in Chemical Engineering working on gas phase methods for chemically passivating silicon surfaces for semiconductor manufacturing. She received her PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign working on microfluidic platforms for the crystallization and study of membrane protein crystallization with Prof. Paul J.A. Kenis. She began working as a postdoc for Prof. Matthew Tirrell in the Bioengineering Department at the University of California at Berkeley and moved with the lab to the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. Her initial research in the Tirrell Group focused on the use of self-assembling DNA-lipid films for use in transfection. She then expanded her research to investigate the self-assembly, structure, and physics of biomimetic polyelectrolyte systems known as complex coacervates for use as artificial organelles or nanoreactors.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Arthi Jayaraman



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Lashanda Korley



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Jon K. Pokorski



Professor Pokorski began his scientific career by earning his B.S. in Biochemistry from UCLA in 2002, where he worked in private industry developing biomedical devices. In 2007 Prof. Pokorski earned his doctoral degree in organic chemistry from Northwestern University, designing, synthesizing, and testing a variety of peptidomimetic systems. Upon completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Pokorski moved to The Scripps Research Institute where he combined the chemical and genetic engineering of viral nanoparticles to make novel drug delivery systems. Dr. Pokorski was supported by both the NIH molecular biophysics and biotechnology training grants during his Ph.D. studies. During postdoctoral training, he first earned an NIH Ruth Kirschstein fellowship and later secured an NIH Pathway to Independence Award. He is now a Professor at the Department of Macromolecular Science, Case Western Reserve University, OH, USA.

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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Rodney D. Priestley



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Watson Loh



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Bryan W. Boudouris



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Sarah Heilshorn



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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Andrew Spakowitz



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Plenary Speaker

Dr. Qinghuang Lin



Qinghuang Lin is a Research Staff Member and a manager at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. He received his B.E. and M.S. degrees from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, Michigan. An IBM Master Inventor, Dr. Lin is an inventor or co-inventor of more than 70 granted US patents and over 70 pending US patents. He is a recipient of 23 IBM Invention Achievement Awards. Dr. Lin is an editor or a co-editor of 2 books and 7 conference proceedings volumes and the author and co-author of over 65 technical papers. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS, and MOEMS and served as a Guest Editor of Journal of Materials Research focus issue on self-assembly and directed assembly of advanced materials. In 2002, Dr. Lin, along with colleagues, received an IBM Research Division Achievement Award for “invention, development and implementation of 248nm bilayer resist technology in manufacturing.” This IBM bilayer resist technology was also part of the 40 years of innovations in semiconductor technology that won IBM 2004 US National Medal of Technology. In 2014, Dr. Lin was named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS Fellow). He is Chair-Elect of the American Chemical Society: Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering (PMSE) division. Dr. Lin has been active in serving the scientific communities, having delivered over 50 keynote or invited talks and served as conference chair, co-chair, vice chair, organizers and organizing committees of numerous IBM, national and international conferences.
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Plenary Speaker

Prof. Hadley Sikes



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Prof. Elodie Boisselier



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Plenary Speaker

Dr. Cedric Loubat



Cédric Loubat earned his PhD degree in Polymer Chemistry from University of Montpellier (FRANCE) in 2000.
He performed his PhD headed by Prof. B. Boutevin, whose team of researchers is internationally recognized in the field of functional polymer chemistry.
As a PhD student and then as a Post-doctoral researcher, Dr. Loubat started to acquire a strong experience in the field of Polymer Chemistry and, that time being, also figured out that there was a missing link in between academic researches and industrial researches.
Indeed, most of the scientific advances and innovations generated within academic researchers were often nipped in the bud since these laboratories do not have the abilities to produced intermediate-scales batches to validate proof of concept at pilot, semi-industrial or industrial scales. Following this awareness, Dr. Loubat, with the support of Prof. Boutevin, started to lay out the foundation of SPECIFIC POLYMERS. The Company was finally created in January 2003 to help academics and industrial researchers to value their research work in the field of functional polymer chemistry at larger scales.
Nowadays, Dr. Loubat is still heading SPECIFIC POLYMERS (www.specificpolymers.fr) and the company have now 12 employees (3PhD, 6 Engineers, 2 Technicians, 1 Adm.).
The company Turnover reached 1 million of euro in 2016 and SPECIFIC POLYMERS works with more than 500 customers (300 academics and 200 industrials) located all over the world (35 countries). In more than 14 years, SPECIFIC POLYMERS has been involved in many research and development programs and performed several on-demand synthesis and up-scaled production for academic and industrial researchers looking for functional monomers, oligomers and polymers at the grams to kilograms scale (more than 10 000 (macro)molecules have been synthesized in this period of time and 1 000 are now part of SPECIFIC POLYMERS catalog).
This activity helped SPECIFIC POLYMERS partners and customers to bring their ideas one step further in a wide range of applications where functional polymers bring interest (surface finishing, glass, metal, metal oxides, nanoparticles, plastics), building industry, aeronautic, pharmaceutical industry, cosmetic, organic electronic, optoelectronic, optic, water treatment, metal extraction, energy (petroleum additives, fuel cells, solar cells or lithium batteries).
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